IN PRACTICE, IT’S GOOD FOR YOU

SHINRIN-YOKU, ALSO KNOWN AS FOREST THERAPY

IS A TERM THAT MEANS “FOREST BATHING”.

The concept was developed in Japan during the 80s

with the purpose of treating high levels of stress.

Forest Therapy is rooted in century old traditions that span across many cultures worldwide. The practice of being close to nature is not exclusive of the Japanese culture. Every culture in the world has developed their own traditions of nature connection and its healing and relaxing properties.

The Japanese, Shinrin-Yoku, pattern and process system inspired ours, which is distinguished by the cultural differences and the natural environments by which we are surrounded. The main difference is that we will not perform exercise.

The idea is simple: by being in a natural setting walking in a relaxed and connected way, we can achieve a series of benefits: relaxation and restoring of the nervous system. This practice follows the general principle that being in nature is good for us and highly contribute to our well being.

Activities in the forest or in a natural area are therapeutic when, through the senses, in a calm and conscious way, we open a space of listening and acceptance.

 

The activities that we carry out, from the therapeutic point of view, start from the following premises:

 

– Therapeutic intention to connect with nature in a sensory way, with the senses, and move consciously.

 

– They are performed without haste, are not intended to perform physical exercises.

 

– Interactions with the environment requires attention.

 

– The relationship with nature and the therapeutic impact develops over time. It’s not a one-time event.

 

– Routines that help deepen relationships with nature and health benefits are established. It’s not just about hiking in the woods.

 

The guide and the invitations offered help the participants to slow down and awaken the senses,

realizing the nuances of interactions in the natural environment.